Climate-neutral urban areas: the choice between gas, electricity or heat delivery

27-05-2015

How can you ensure all residential areas in The Netherlands become carbon-neutral? What measures are needed, and what does it all cost? CE Delft has answered these questions in their study 'Climate-neutral built-up areas 2050'.

Press Release

How can you ensure all residential areas in The Netherlands become carbon-neutral? What measures are needed, and what does it all cost? CE Delft has answered these questions in their study 'Climate-neutral built-up areas 2050 '. The study indicates when natural gas and green gas remain the best options to heat buildings and houses in the future. The study also shows that in the future, heat delivery is the cheapest option for half of all homes, gas for another quarter of homes and electric heat pumps for the other quarter. The CE Delft study was commissioned by GasTerra.

There are more than seven million homes the Netherlands, and 90% of these properties are heated with natural gas. In the coming 35 years, these properties have to become climate-neutral. For the first time, CE Delft has calculated the costs of thirty different alternative climate-neutral methods to heat homes, for all the residential areas in The Netherlands.

For fifteen typical neighbourhoods, representative of 95% of all residential areas in the Netherlands, they calculated what the integral costs of heating are. These costs include everything from the production of the heat, the energy network and the heating system to energy-saving measures. With respect to the production of heat, they looked at options for heating individual homes, such as heat pumps and pellet stoves, but also at collective systems such as geothermal energy. Initially, the idea is to gradually replace natural gas by green gas. Because green gas is a scarce energy source, the price will automatically go up when demand increases. This will result in situations where neighbourhoods with a cheap heat source, such as residual heat or geothermal energy, and where the construction of district heating systems is profitable, will switch to heat delivery (this is expected to apply to half of all homes). In other areas, where the maintenance or replacement of both the electricity and gas network is expensive and where houses can be cheaply insulated, natural gas will be replaced by electric heat pumps.

Download the report as PDF (only available in Dutch)

Note for the editors:

CE Delft is an independent research and consulting agency, specialized in the development of structural and innovative solutions to environmental issues. Characteristics of CE Delft solutions are: politically feasible, technologically sound, economically prudent and socially equitable. The latest information of CE Delft is available at www.ce.nl

For more information, contact:
Han Schouten, CE Delft press officer, schouten@ce.nl, tel. +31 (0)15 2150195